Recession hit americans flock to movies in droves

Recession hit americans flock to movies in droves

If Hollywood had their way, Americans would go to the movies more than ever.

That might have changed in 2010, but for a host of reasons, including the financial crisis, recession and the decline in global sales of movie tickets — th김해출장샵e biggest movie season of all time in 2013 — moviegoers stayed away.

“The loss of the economic downturn and the loss of the popularity and popularity of movies has really changed people’s behavior,” says Steven Radyak, CEO and founder of the independent marketing company MovieBiz. “People who aren’t involved in the busine구미안마ss are less likely to show up in the parking lots and more likely to s김해출장마사지kip the movie altogether.”

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That is, movies seem to be a more attractive proposition for moviegoers in general.

But not the people who pay the highest prices.

“The film industry doesn’t have that wide appeal, so they’re probably having to find more creative uses for the revenues they’ve made,” says James Laube, head of the economics department at the movie rental site The Regulator.

Laube also blames the film industry, which uses its vast library of films to sell its products.

“While I understand the appeal, it is very disheartening for consumers and it should not impact moviegoing in any way,” he says.

But critics say that, as long as moviegoers have movie tickets, their disposable income — more than $100 billion a year in 2013 — still means a lot to a company like Cinemark. As of August, the company had $11 billion worth of movie revenue — more than any other movie rental site except Amazon Prime membership.

Cinemark has about 4,400 locations nationwide and has a franchise business that sells thousands of movies — some of them on demand — and offers a wide selection of movie products.

“We’ve seen a lot of movies — we sell them on a daily basis.” says Gary Williams, senior vice president of international marketing at CinemaBlend. “There is one, for instance, that is 100,000 years old that’s made for $6.50.”

At the same time, those movies are expensive.

“We’re definitely doing our share of damage control to make it more appealing,” says Williams. “We’re trying to appeal to the movie-goer and to the person who is a consumer of the film that’s going to spend five dollars on the movie at th